Fictional layer on social networks

Here’s a fabulous idea! On social network profiles, there will be space for one’s fictional alter egos. In other words, my profile on orkut or friendster or tribe or even LinkedIn should include my past role-playing game character information. One could suck in data from one’s Everquest or World of Warcraft or MUD characters, and manually put in data about tabletop rpgs.
It’s important, because who you like to pretend you are is important. Among role-playing gamers I certainly know people who think about the patterns in their game-playing, and who consciously use the characters to vary their real life persona, to experiment with ways of being, as well as to play to their real life characteristics and strengths.

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2 Responses to Fictional layer on social networks

  1. CV says:

    Thats gives people a possibility to change their life. To change the environmental burdens.
    In one way, we can do the same with blogging. Try to change our attitude and how we look and so on
    Chadie
    http://chadie.typepad.com/dojo/

  2. deepikaur says:

    You know, I think people already do something along those lines already. With the plethora of web services available and the immaculate integration of Web 2.0/Social Media into our lives, some people have gone forward in creating an online personality of sorts, reflecting who they WANT to be. Does that make sense?

    Let’s approach it from a different angle.. Most sites you sign up for these days have an “About Me” box in the profile. IMO, more often than not, people fill those out in a tone they wish they reflected. Some bloggers do the same. And online discussion boards.. A person could say they’re the VIP of whatever sport they claim to play, have won oh so many competitions, but no one has a way of knowing for sure. Fake accounts under fake alias are created often.

    However, the effects aren’t always negative. Interacting with people one hasn’t ever met online can help one develop their personality. Building friendships with people they may not ever meet, someone who could be anyone, can help in the development of key traits, as well as help strengthen their self esteem and help them make better decisions in the long run.

    Great post. Though it got me a tad bit off topic, it certainly had me thinking! =)

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